What Went Wrong: Vincent Trocheck’s Goal

This one probably is going to bring back a ton of bad memories for a lot of people. At the same time, it’s actually a goal that shows just how important shooting the puck and puck possession are, so let’s review Vincent Trocheck’s first goal from Saturday night.

Each of the pictures has text explaining what happened, you may need to click on each page to read it depending on how your browser displays it. We’ll sum up the play as a whole after.

Via NHL.com

Via NHL.com

Via NHL.com

Via NHL.com

Via NHL.com

Via NHL.com

Via NHL.com

Via NHL.com

Via NHL.com

Via NHL.com

Via NHL.com

Via NHL.com

Via NHL.com

Via NHL.com

 

 

Final Summary:

 

There’s really no one player to blame on this. The play was broken the second the two Flyers ran into each other in the faceoff dot in the offensive zone. Luke Schenn then doesn’t step up and prevent a zone exit for the Panthers. Jokinen fires a perfect knuckleball of a shot that Mason had no expectation to cleanly handle, and if he puts the rebound in the corners instead of the slot this mess never happens. Medvedev takes a path to the puck that makes me wonder if he thought he Sean Couturier was a Panther, it’s seriously the only explanation I can come up with after watching this goal 50-55 times. Medvedev’s awkward wrong side of the slot approach where he cedes position to Trocheck only makes sense if he didn’t realize the next player back was a teammate and instead thought it was another Panther.

From the fancy stat theory side, this goal emphasizes why clean exits and shooting are important. Jokinen’s speed from defensive zone to red line means that he had the option to shoot or attempt to get past Luke Schenn. Schenn’s showing in the yellow line picture above shows he realized he needed to hold the defensive blue line and would have likely done so.

Now, by shooting the puck, and bouncing it a foot out of the crease, Jokinen prevents Mason from any reasonable hope of a clean save. Sure, maybe Mason can make the initial save 2 feet out of the crease where he’s got the chance to control the rebound to the corner or drop back and cover it, but I feel like that’s a bit too nitpicky, even for me.

Goals like this one, are really caused by luck (the Panthers having two Flyers run into each other) but also seizing the opportunity. This goal literally cannot happen if Jussi Jokinen does not shoot the puck. The only way to create fluky rebound chances is to shoot. Now yes, 49 out of 50 times, the defender will beat Trocheck to the rebound, but the only way to create these chances is to start them.

As for blame on this goal; it’s both defenders. The Flyers tying themselves up on the faceoff would be semi-comical in most cases. After which Luke Schenn fails to step up, but that by itself isn’t the end, Medvedev’s weird approach to cut off Sean Couturier seals it, but neither event happens without the other. It’s a catch-22, each defender’s bad decision is compounded because the other one also made an equally bad decision. If Medvedev takes the proper angle to the puck, no one remembers that Schenn just stood there. If Schenn stands up Jokinen on the offensive blueline, it’s either a 2 on 2 with Jokinen and Trocheck against Medvedev and the back-checking Wayne Simmonds or Jokinen passing to Trocheck on the Panther side of the blueline, and Trocheck going one on one with Medvedev.

And STILL, none of that matters if Mason either recovers the initial save and gets the puck to the corner.

So, the best to hope for is that this goal is really a result of Medvedev not adjusting to the NHL game from the KHL and two partners who are still getting to know each other not knowing who had which coverage responsibility.

Add a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.